Monday, December 12, 2016

DIY hammock with stretchable footbox and knotty mod


I sewed my first hammock DIY project.  This 11' hammock is made from 1.0 oz Hyper D ripstop nylon.  It is double-sided, has a Hangnout's Stretchable Footbox and a Knotty Mod Stretch Side on the opposite side from the footbox.  I sewed some additional D-Rings in the edge channel to be used to attach a bug net and/or a pillow.  Detailed sewing instructions and my pattern can be found below.  

DIY Double-Sided Hammock with Stretchable Footbox and Knotty Mod.







LineLocks secure the shock cord on the footbox. 

Linelocks secure the shock cord on the Knotty Mod Stretch Side.

D-Rings are sewn into the edge strip for later use attaching a bug net and/or a pillow.


Hangnouts's design for a Stretchable Footbox.


Knotty-Mod side of the hammock is just fine as a footbox.

Gathered end hammock with fixed ridgeline and whoopie sling suspension

I can really stretch out on the diagonal.
----------------------------------------------------
YOU CAN SEW ONE TOO



https://drive.google.com/open?id=1R6Fs1yAa871M3i6r4_L13nF84-q-8U7LqA
Click on pattern to open larger version in a new window.

What you need to make this project
Outer Fabric: 5 1/2 yards 60”wide Ripstop Nylon (shown in yellow)
Lining Fabric: 5 yards 60”wide Ripstop Nylon (shown in grey)
Ridgeline: 83% of length of hammock, 109.56” finished length
Amsteel 8" Continuous Loop (2)
LineLocks (2)
1/2" D-Rings (6)
Shock-Cord 12'
Grograin Ribbon 4'
These materials were purchased from ripstopbytheroll.com and dutchwaregear.com


Detailed Sewing Instructions
1)      Cut from Outer Fabric
a)      Outer shell:  Cut 1:  144” length
b)      Edge Strips:  Cut 12:  3” wide strips for edge fabric.  Trim some of the pieces to the following lengths:
    1. 2 at 42.5”
    2. 2 at 28”
    3. 2 at 4”
    4. 2 at 3”
    5. 1 at 41”
    6. 1 at 45”
    7. 1 at 42” (for Knotty Mod)
    8. 2 at 28.5”
c)      Footbox:  Cut 1:  13” x 41” half-oval
2)      Cut from Inner Fabric: 
a)      Lining:  Cut 1:  144” length
b)      Edge Strips:  Cut 1:  3” wide strip, trim to 41” length
c)      Footbox:  Cut 1:  13” x 41” elongated half-circle
3)      Assemble hardware:
a)      Cut 8 6” pieces of webbing (seal raw edge with flame).
b)      Slide on D-Rings and LineLocks and then fold webbing in half so that the webbing is 3” long.  Pin into place.
c)      Secure loop with stitching along the cut edges of stich on the overlap in the shape of an X. 
4)      Assemble Outer Fabric for Hammock: 
a)      Sew edge strips using the “continuous binding” method:  with right sides together, sew 3” wide strips together on bias with sufficient length to create 2 144” long continuous 3” wide strips of fabric. 
b)      With right sides together, sew one edge strip onto each side of the outer fabric using a ½” seam allowance.
5)      Assemble Knotty-Mod Side Lining Edge
a)      With right sides together, pin each piece together with hardware in this sequence:  42.5” + D-Ring + 28” + D-Ring + 4” + LineLock + 45” + D-Ring + 28.5.  Hardware should be carefully placed so that it is just inside of where the ½” seam allowance (taking care to note the outward side of the LineLock).  Sew with a ½” seam allowance.  After sewn, flatten out the joining seams with D-Ring webbing facing the head and foot end of the strip and reinforce the webbing with stitching in the shape of an X.
b)      Knotty Mod:  cut one piece of edge strip 42” in length and sew a ½” rolled hem on each 3” edge.  Center on head side lining edge between the hardware with both right-sides facing up and pin in place.
c)      With right sides together, pin Knotty Mod-side lining edge to the edge of the lining fabric.  Sew with a ½” seam allowance. 
6)      Assemble Footbox Side Lining Edge 
a)      Pin together edge pieces in the following sequence: 42.5” + D-Ring + 28” + D-Ring + 4” + LineLock + 3” + 41” Lining Fabric + 3” + D Ring + 28.5”.  Hardware should be carefully placed so that it is just inside of where the ½” seam allowance (taking care to note the outward side of the LineLock).  Sew with a ½” seam allowance.  After sewn, flatten out the joining seams with D-Ring webbing facing the head and foot end of the strip and reinforce the webbing with stitching in the shape of an X.
7)      Assemble Footbox
a)      Fold a ½” double-rolled hem at each square bottom corner of both the outer and lining fabric footbox, taking care to make sure that the folds match when the right sides are placed together.
b)      Pin the lining foot box to the foot side lining fabric edge and sew with a ½” seam alliance. 
c)      Carefully line up the outer fabric footbox to the outer fabric foot side lining edge and attach the outer fabric with a ½” seam allowance.
8)      Attach Lining to Outer Fabric
a)      With right sides together, pin outer fabric and lining fabric together, taking care to make sure that the foot boxes exactly line up with each other and that all edges are squared. 
b)      Sew together with a ½” seam allowance, taking care to skip the rolled hem on the foot box (this will allow the shock cord to exit on each side of the footbox).
c)       Turn fabric right-side out and flatten all seams.
d)      Sew a 1” seam around the arch of the footbox, taking care not to sew through the rolled hem so that the shock cord will be able to exit on each side.
9)      Rolled Hem
a)      At the head end of the hammock along the unfinished edges, pin a 3” double-rolled hem and sew across the edge 3 times (with stitching placed approximately 1/4” apart to reinforce the seam.  Repeat on foot end.
10)   Attach Amsteel continuous loops to each end and ridge line.

Design Inspiration

11 comments:

  1. This is great, thanks for posting these instructions and for the video; it was very informative. I actually have materials for my 2nd DIY hammock that I intended to work on a couple weeks ago and got delayed. Now I'm glad I did as you've got some features I really want to incorporate. Thanks again for sharing and well done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good luck with your project. Please report back on what you decide to do.

      Delete
  2. this is a great instructions, especially with the videos. Can you provide some more how you connected the footbox to the body of the hammock? looking at making a new single layer hammock out of RBTR 1.7 Robic and want the footbox but have not been able to figure out the attachment yet

    ReplyDelete
  3. If you are doing a single-layer hammock, you could simply line the footbox up with the edge of your hem (before doing your double-rolled edge, and sew it in place. I suggest your footbox is still double-layered, as it will make life 10X easier for sewing the channel on the curved edge.

    After attaching the footbox, sew the double-rolled hem all along the edge and also double-roll the hem of where you sewed the footbox in.

    Does this make sense?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Jellyfish. this is perfect. wish that I had your ridgeline video about a month ago when I trying to get my ridgeline seam straight.

    what are your thought on the hybrid felled seam vs warbonnet method for the tarp ridgeline?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not familiar with the warbonnet ridgeline. What do they do?

      Delete
  5. One pass across the ridgeline then enclose with ribbon. Sewing the final step of the flat felled ridgeline was a killer and the inside does not look great. may try this on my next tarp. why is there always a next tarp or hammock???

    here are 2 older discussions:
    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/84348-Grosgrain-Tarp-Ridgeline

    https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/showthread.php/77409-My-Second-DIY-Tarp!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think this looks like a good option. It may add a little to the weight, but it is probably marginal.

      Delete
    2. I totally agree on next hammock/next tarp. I'm already planning a summer hex tarp. It might be blue. hahaha

      Delete
  6. what a lovely tutorial and pattern, using the golden section is a delightful idea. Can you tell us why you chose to make the hammock double?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I made it double-layer because I have a 4-legged hammock heater named Stuart, so I wanted the extra strength. He is only 50 pounds, so I probably could get away with just a single-layer, but having it double makes me feel better when there is a dog in the hammock with me.

      Delete